Hearing Loss News

19 Jun
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 11 Views | Comments Closed

Santa Brings 7-Year Old the Gift of Hearing

This past holiday season, children filled out their Christmas lists to send to Santa. Hoverboards and video games topped the lists of many. However, for one special 7-year old in Deerfield Beach, Florida, all she wanted was the gift of better hearing.

Every year, the All American Hearing network of hearing healthcare providers holds a special holiday contest. We give the gift of hearing to someone in need of hearing help. We ask that the loved ones, friends and family members of the person who is in need, to write Santa a letter and explain why the gift of hearing should be given to the person in need. Each year we receive submissions from across the United States. This year we received hundreds of requests from the loved ones of those in need.

As you can probably imagine, it is not easy narrowing down hundreds of submissions to just one. In an effort to help all with their hearing loss, we offer a buy one get one free deal to everyone who had a submission. This is a savings of over $2,000!

Each submission is read by a panel at All American Hearing. We read every single letter that comes into our mailbox. These letters are touching and moving. This year, one submission stood out.

Kaitlyn Newland was born with a hearing loss. She has needed hearing aids since birth to hear and speak. Her hearing loss has affected her everyday life. According to a submission from her school, Trinity Christian School, “Kaitlyn is struggling in class and at home with ordinary tasks, and would greatly benefit from positive interactions and experiences in her young life.” Several other letters indicated that Kaitlyn’s hearing loss has effected her learning that she has fell so far behind in school that she faced the possibility of being held back.

Kaitlyn has a twin sister. We know how close twins are in life. Kaitlyn had been separated from certain parts of her life due to her hearing loss, we did not want her to be separated from her twin sister in school as well.

Letters from Santa

Submissions received for Kaitlyn Newland

We received four submissions from her school, aunt, grandmother and family friend urging us to choose Kaitlyn for the gift of better hearing. With her whole life ahead of her and the opportunity to live it to it’s fullest present, we choose Kaitlyn Newland as the recipient of a brand new pair of Audibel A4 hearing aids.

This is the part of the story where one would think everything was going according to plan. We have a 7-year old little girl who struggles with hearing loss that lives just minutes away from our office in Deerfield Beach, FL. Shortly after contacting her family and letting them know the good news, we were informed that Kaitlyn and her family were moving north to Greenville, SC. What was once a 10 minute drive to our office now turned into a three hour trip and over 200 miles to our closest office in Rome, GA.

Not to be deterred, we worked with Kaitlyn’s mother, Christina, and the local office in Rome, GA (Audibel) to work with their schedule to get Kaitlyn the help she so desperately needed. Finally, after weeks of conversation and planning, we were able to visit with Kaitlyn in our Rome, GA office in March of 2017, three months after it was announced she was the winner. In an email from Katilyn’s mom Christina, she wrote “When we went to the hearing center in Rome, GA she was having a pretty bad day since we had to drive at 4:30 am to make the appointment but please know that she is over the moon about getting a new set of hearing aids.”

Christina, Katilyn’s mother, drove Kaitlyn the 200+ miles trip to Rome, GA for appointment number one. With both parties determined to find a solution that would greatly benefit Kaitlyn, a set of brand new Audibel A4 hearing aids were selected by the hearing healthcare provider Charles Scoggins. Charles even customized the hearing aids for Kaitlyn to fit her exact ear canal.

Kaitlyn would have to make the 200 mile trip one more time to get her brand new custom hearing aids. Finally, in early April, Kaitlyn returned to our Rome, GA office to receive her hearing aids. The impact the hearing aids had on Kaitlyn’s life was instant. While she had hearing aids in the past, they were not as technologically advanced as the set she received from All American Hearing.

Christina wrote to us in an email after they received the hearing aids:

“The hearing aids have been such a blessing for Kaitlyn.  She loves the hearing aids and loves he fact that she can turn them up or down whenever she needs it. They are amazing, the technology is unbelievable and it has completely changed her mood. She is so much more controlled, calm and social.  She is not embarrassed to tell people she wears hearing aids anymore.  I am overwhelmed with joy, and it brings tears to my eyes to see how different she is now and how this has impacted our lives. I can’t thank you enough for choosing her. Thanks again for caring and for helping Kaitlyn be a normal little girl.  We will be forever grateful.”

It’s stories like Kaitlyn’s that drives our hearing healthcare providers across the nation to help more people hear better. The impact that proper hearing can have on someone’s life is priceless. Kaitlyn will now be able to learn at the level she is capable of in her classes. She can experience life in a way she had not had before. She can converse with her twin sister about all things sisters love to talk about. Her mother, Christina, can smile knowing that Kaitlyn is no loner embarrassed about her hearing loss.

We want to extend a special thank you to Kaitlyn, her mother Christina, those who submitted submission’s on Kaitlyn’s behalf, her entire family who accompanied Kaitlyn to the appointment and our local staff in Rome, GA, Charles and Sharon Scoggins. Together, we all made an impact and a different in one little girls life.

Kaitlyn Newland with Chalres and Sharon Scoggins

Kaitlyn Newland with our hearing healthcare provider Charles Scoggins and office manager Sharon Scoggins in Rome, GA

14 Dec
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 573 Views | Comments Closed

Tips For Communicated With The Hearing Impaired

Does someone you know wear hearing aids but they still sometimes have difficulty understanding what is being said?  Hearing aids cannot fix the damage inside the ear, they simply amplify the damaged haircells.  So sometimes the person still may misinterpret what is being said.  There are things you can do to help the person understand correctly the first time:

  • Understand that hearing aids do not restore normal hearing. We can do amazing things with hearing aids but they cannot repair the damage to the auditory system.
  • Remember that just because a person can hear your voice, does not mean they can understand your words. Hearing loss may cause distortion in the way sounds are perceived. “Toothpaste” may sound like “suitcase” even when speech is loud enough.
  • Speak naturally and with normal expression. People with hearing loss may need things repeated.  But when a person with hearing loss isn’t understanding you, your natural instinct may be to raise your voice.  Shouting or raising your voice can often make things more distorted.  Louder doesn’t mean clearer, it just means loud!
  • Slow down your rate of speech.
  • Quiet places will assist communication. Be aware of noises that may be in the listening environment that can effect speech understanding. Things like air conditioners, fans, TVs, water running, restaurant noise, and other people’s conversations can all significantly effect the ease of communication for someone with hearing loss.
  • Gain someone’s attention before you start a conversation. Address them directly by saying their name before starting a conversation so they have time to focus.
  • Hearing aids will help you hear conversations at a reasonable distance. Decrease the distance between you and the listener. This is the single most effective way to increase understanding. Speech understanding is significantly decreased beyond 15 feet so do not expect your loved one to understand you when you are in the basement and they are on the 3rd floor!  If you can’t see the person’s face, you are probably too far away for effective communication.
  • If a hard of hearing person needs something repeated, instead of repeating it the exact same way, try rephrasing it.  For example:
    “We are joining the Smiths for dinner at 6.”
    “What?”
    “We are going to the Outback with Joan and Bob for dinner tonight.”
  • Finally, look directly at the person! Most people with hearing loss use visual cues to fill in where they may misunderstand.   The lips, face and body gestures all provide valuable cues and can help fill in for sounds they are not getting.
14 Dec
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 1221 Views | Comments Closed

Retrain Your Brain

Congratulations on taking the step to better hearing.  Good communication effects everything.  The National Council on Aging reports that hearing loss negatively impacts quality of life, personal relationships, communication ability, and it can cause depression.  Although no hearing aid can restore your hearing to 100% normal, they have evolved over the years and are quite amazing tiny devices.  The following tips will help you get the most out of your new hearing aids.

Wearing Hearing AidsTip #1
Wear your hearing aids!  Hearing aids cannot help you if they are in your sock drawer.  You need to wear them consistently.  Hearing aids are made to be worn 12-16 hours a day.  Getting use to your new hearing is a process.  If your brain is getting an inconsistent signal because you are not wearing the aids on a regular basis, the process of getting use to your hearing aids will be longer and more difficult.  It is also important to wear them in all listening situations.  Even if you are home alone, and there is no one to talk to, wear your hearing aids!  You cannot expect to do well in a challenging noisy situation if you brain is not use to hearing in an easy quiet situation.   The exception to this is that you do not want to wear your hearing aids around dangerous noise levels (lawnmower, leaf blower, or snow blower).  You cannot reverse hearing loss but you can prevent further damage from noise exposure.  When you are using power equipment, take your hearing aids out and use hearing protection.

Tip #2
Things will sound different when you are wearing your hearing aids.  This is completely normal, especially in the beginning!  Remember that those sounds have always been there, you just haven’t heard them the way you are now.  The brain needs time to make sense of what you are hearing.  You actually need to retrain your brain to hear with your hearing aids.  One of the first things you will notice when you are wearing your hearing aids is that your own voice sounds different.  It may sound a bit hollow or louder than what you remember.  If you are wearing your hearing aids consistently, your own voice will be one of the first things you adapt to.

Tip #3
Don’t expect to hear everything.  Even people with normal hearing need things repeated or may misinterpret what is said from time to time.  Hearing aids cannot give you better hearing than people with normal hearing, so have reasonable expectations.  It is helpful if you share information about your hearing loss with family and friends.  Sometimes family assumes that once you have hearing aids you should hear perfectly … even when you are in the basement and they talking to you from the third floor!

Cleaning Hearing AidsTip #4
Hearing aids need maintenance.  Just like a car, hearing aids need check-ups to be sure they are in good working order and to maintain the best sound quality.  Hearing aids should be checked and cleaned every 3-4 months for best performance.  An audiological re-evaluation should be done every year to be sure hearing has not changed.  If it has, the hearing aids may need to be adjusted or fine tuned to compensate for the change in your hearing.  If you have questions or concerns, talk to your hearing healthcare provider.  We are here to help!

17 Nov
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 1906 Views | Comments Closed

Everything You Need to Know About Hearing Aid Batteries

Hearing aid batteries use zinc-air technology. What is zinc-air technology? As the name implies, zinc-air technology uses oxygen from the atmosphere as an active ingredient. There are some other unique aspects that make zinc-air batteries different from other types of batteries:

Need for a Sticker/Tab

Hearing aid batteries need a tab or sticker to seal the vent holes in the battery and prevent dry out. Do not peel off the paper tab until you are ready to change your battery.

Letting Your Hearing Aid Battery BreathLet the Battery Breathe

This is very important. Once you peel off the paper tab, it is important to let the battery “catch its breath.” As air starts to enter the holes under the paper tab, it activates the battery. We always recommend that you let the battery sit for a full 3-5 minutes before you insert it into your hearing aid and shut the door. That is important because it allows the voltage in the battery to rise and ensures that you will not have start-up problems with the hearing aid.

Use Right Away

Zinc-air batteries are best used right after you peel off the tab. This is because the battery begins to discharge as soon as that tab is removed. It is impossible to stop that discharge from occurring once you have removed the tab. Replacing the paper tab will not stop the battery from draining.

Environment

Battery performance, and ultimately hearing aid performance, can be sensitive to the environment. Heat, cold and humidity all can affect the life of your battery.

Reminders

:

  1. Keep on the paper tab until ready to use.
  2. Once you peel of the paper tab, let the battery breathe for 3-5 minutes before you close your battery door.
  3. Batteries will slowly drain as soon as you remove the tab even if you are not using your hearing aid.
  4. Keep your batteries in a cool and dry place.
17 Nov
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 639 Views | Comments Closed

What To Expect From Your Hearing Aids

Knowing what to expect and having realistic expectations from hearing aids can ensure your maximum satisfaction with them. When you first get hearing aids, your brain will take a while to get used to hearing sounds again at the pitches where you have hearing loss. Your brain will also need some time to adjust to the sound quality of your hearing aids. We call this adaptation. Your brain will adapt to your new hearing, although it can several weeks to several months. We want your hearing experience to be positive and happy, and we will work with you during the early days to make your adaptation to wearing hearing aids as easy as possible.

Over time your perception of sound will change, so during the trial period we often need to make tuning adjustments to the hearing aids to account for your brain adapting. This is very normal. By working closely with you we can be sure your hearing aids are adjusted optimally for your individual needs.

Here are some of the things we will ask you to keep in mind when the hearing aids are new:

  • Things will sound different at first and you need to just give your brain time to adjust to listening to the new sounds your hearing aids pick up. The adaptation period can take anywhere from a few weeks to months.
  • At first you might think that the sound from your hearing aids is unnatural. Give it time, be patient and persevere. Gradually your hearing nerves and brain will adjust to hearing sound again and over time, your hearing aids will sound more natural.
  • With hearing aids you should be able to hear many sounds you can’t hear without them, and some of these might take you by surprise. You should notice improved hearing in many listening situations that are important to you.
  • Hearing aids will help you hear better but they do not restore normal hearing. This is because they are hearing aids not ear replacements.
  • Wearing hearing aids doesn’t mean you’ll be able to hear every sound in every situation. Remember, even people with normal hearing miss sounds from time to time.
  • Part of the hearing aid fitting process is tuning your hearing aids to your particular hearing needs. We do this over several appointments with time between each appointment so you can try your aids out in a variety of listening situations
17 Nov
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 1442 Views | Comments Closed

7 Tips For Hearing Better At Your Favorite Restaurant

Following a conversation in a noisy restaurant can be a challenge for those who have normal hearing. But when you have hearing loss, the clanging dishes, music, and voices in a large open area can make hearing when dining out nearly impossible. In Zagat’s 2014 America’s Top Restaurants Survey, a noisy restaurant is the #1 complaint from diners, even over bad service. But these 7 tips will help you make your next night out on the town more enjoyable!

  1. If you have a choice between a table or a booth, pick a booth.
  2. Look above you.  Are you sitting directly under the air conditioner, fan or music speaker?  Loud music is not your friend! If you ask, sometimes the restaurant will agree to turn down the volume of the music if you explain that it is too loud for you to communicate with your dinner guests.
  3. If your hearing aids have directional microphones (two microphones instead of one), put the greatest amount of noise behind you.  Directional microphones are designed to reduce sounds from the side and the rear and focus on sounds in front of you. Think of it this way, directional microphones will focus your hearing aids wherever your nose is pointing. So if you are facing into a noisy restaurant, the directional microphones will be focusing on the greatest amount of background noise. That is not good! When your hearing aids have directional microphones, the best spot to sit in is the one that will put room noise behind you.
  4. If you are dining with a larger group, avoid sitting at the ends of the table. It is very difficult to hear from one end to the other so try to sit in the middle. Be realistic. You are not going to hear everyone, so sit next to people you like!
  5. Don’t sit near the kitchen, bar or the hostess area. The ambient noise from these locations will be distracting.
  6. Look at the person who is talking. When you are in a challenging listening situation, like a restaurant, you are going to need to use some visual cues.
  7. Pick your seat! Don’t be afraid to tell the hostess that where you sit will make a difference on how much you enjoy your meal.  Calling ahead and telling the hostess where you need to sit will avail a long wait once you get there.

 

19 Oct
Written by in Hearing Loss News | 805 Views | Comments Closed

Preventing Tinnitus

By: Dr. Kent Collins, TeleHear

Over 50 million American suffer from some form of tinnitus – sound heard in the head usually described as ringing, hissing, or buzzing. The Centers for Disease Control estimates that approximately ½ of these individuals experience chronic tinnitus while 2 million suffer from debilitating cases. There are a plethora of treatment options including over-the-counter supplements, psychological counseling techniques, sound therapy, and sound stimulus through hearing aid treatment. None have eliminated tinnitus.

Like any preventable condition, the best way to not suffer from tinnitus is to change your behaviors to prevent it from happening.

We know the most common cause of tinnitus is inner ear damage and the number one cause of inner ear damage is noise exposure. Thus it makes sense the best way to prevent tinnitus is to prevent noise exposure.

What is noise exposure? Noise exposure tends to have two forms: impulsive noise blasts and chronic noise exposure.

  • Impulsive noise blasts are extremely loud, often short during, booms of damaging noise. Most commonly impulsive noise exposure occurs from a gunshot that can cause inner ear hair cell damage from even a one-time occurrence. Other causes of impulsive noise exposure are explosions, car accidents, and some work place injuries.
  • Chronic noise exposure is commonly associated with repeated, day after day, noise exposure at work. For example, factor workers or heavy equipment operators. Another common cause of chronic noise exposure is repeatedly listening to music that is too loud through earbuds.

Regardless if impulsive noise blasts or chronic noise exposure occurs, utilizing hearing protection is the only effective way to prevent inner ear damage. Preventing noise damage from occurring in the first place will lower your risk of experiencing tinnitus.

There are many forms of hearing protection ranging from low cost foam ear plugs to high end custom made in-the-ear sound attenuators. Please consult your local hearing healthcare provider for the best options in hearing protection.

5 Oct
Written by in Hearing Aids | 496 Views | Comments Closed

Why You Should Bring a Third Party to Your Hearing Test

Having a family member or close friend at your hearing test appointment can be valuable in more ways than one. Why?

  • They know you on a personal level: Hearing loss does not just affect the individual with the hearing loss, but rather it affects everyone they communicate with. At your first appointment your family member or friend knows you better than the Audiologist or Hearing Instrument Specialist. They have a better idea of your lifestyle, interests and what situations become harder for you to hear in, so it is important to have them help explain what brought you in for the examination.
  • Familiar voice: Bringing an individual with a familiar voice is very useful during your initial hearing test appointment. Not only can your third party help the provider during the testing process, it is beneficial to for the patient to have a familiar voice and support system while the provider reviews their hearing test results in the office to help the individual better understand their level of loss and the hearing instrument options available to them.
  • Another perspective: Someone who has experienced these struggles with you can share their perspective on the situation. A lot of information is provided to you at your first appointment and it can be an abundance for one person to absorb. The third party can help you recognize your need for the treatment, and provides  support for the patient during the decision process. The third party can also be there to help ask questions that you may not have thought of in that moment. With the provider’s instructions, the three of you can determine which hearing aid make and model would be best suited for your lifestyle.

All American Hearing wants to make your transition into better hearing as easy as possible and we would be happy to lead you and your companion through this process. To schedule a complimentary hearing test, click here.

22 Sep
Written by in Hearing Aids | 1111 Views | Comments Closed

Southern Illinois Helps Give the Gift of Hearing!

Last month marked the 9th annual All American Hearing Celebrity Golf Classic Tournament in West Frankfort, IL. The tournament benefits the Starkey Hearing Foundation, which provides free hearing aids to people in need. Major League Baseball Hall of Famers, Lou Brock and Bob Gibson, from the St.Louis Cardinals, were at the event to sign autographs and to help raise money for this great cause. This year’s event has the biggest turnout to date. A handful of both children and adults were fit with hearing aids.

All American Hearing feels fortunate to once again be able to provide the gift of hearing to those that otherwise would not get the hearing help they deserve. To learn more about the Foundation, or to donate, click here.

22 Aug
Written by in Hearing Aids | 1945 Views | Comments Closed

Doctors Warn About the Dangers of Earbuds

Earbuds, headphones and Bluetooth devices are present everywhere today. From being plugged into your iPhone to MP3 player, they provide listening at gyms, at home and in the workplace. Ear buds are the most popular choice for listening, they weigh almost nothing and are cheap to purchase. The problem is that earbuds are causing hearing damage at an alarming rate.

Earlier this year, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that “1.1 billion young people are at risk of hearing loss because of personal audio devices, such as smartphones, and damaging levels of sound at entertainment venues like electronic dance music festivals, where noise levels can top 120 decibels for hours.”

Dr. Sreekant Cherukuri, an Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist from Munster, Indiana stated that the largest cause of hearing damage in millennials is the use of iPods and smart phones as music devices. Since the 1980’s and 90’s hearing loss in teens is reportedly 30% greater. “You (once) had a Walkman with two AA batteries and headphone thongs that went over your ears,” said Cherukuri. “At high volume, the sound was so distorted and the battery life was poor. Nowadays, we have smart phones that are extremely complex computers with high-level fidelity.” It is a growing problem that could get worse if people do not take necessary precaution.

Some facts to consider:

  • At full volume, iPod and MP3 players, along with other digital music devices, can produce as much noise as if you were attending a live rock concert.
  • 89% of people tend to turn up their earbud volume as cars, lawn mowers, etc. are in the background. Be conscious of this behavior!
  • Follow the 60/60 rule: do not listen to these devices over a 60% volume and for no more than 60 minutes per day.

Cherukuri makes it his mission to educate and attempt to stop young people from wearing earbuds altogether. Since earbuds are so close to an individual’s ear drum, they can raise the volume as much as 9 decibels. People need to be aware that permanent hearing damage can happen in minutes and once the damage is done it is irreversible. It is important to remember to not only protect yourself, but also your children at sporting events, music concerts, riding the subway, etc.

How is your hearing? Get immediate results right now by taking this test online.

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